Final Conference: all deliverables available!

SEFORIS Team

Thank you!

During two conference days we welcomed almost 200 (social) entrepreneurs, policy makers and academics. We would like to thank everybody for being there, for helping out and for adding their voice to the debate. Below you can find all necessary documents, videos, pictures and presentations to get inspired even more, or to relive your favourite moments of the conference.

Photos

You can find all conference photos in our Facebook album.

Presentations

Click on the respective speakers to download the presentations in PDF format!

 

Testimonial presentations:

Library Corner

Click on the links to download the requested documents.

Person-Organization Fit and Incentives: A Casual Test

The Person in Social Entrepreneurship: A Systematic Review of Research on the Social Entrepreneurial Personality

Market-Oriented and Mission-Focused: Social Enterprises Around The Globe

Subliminal influence on generosity

Human capital in social and commercial entrepreneurship

Women's Entrepreneurship: Closing the gender gap in access to financial and other services and in social entrepreneurship

Resisting Temptation

Organizations Driving Positive Social Change: A Review and an Integrative Framework of Change Processes

On the compatibility of benevolence and self-interest: Philanthropy and entrepreneurial orientation

Women CEOs in social enterprises earn 29% less than their male counterparts

Institutions and social entrepreneurship: The role of institutional voids, institutional support, and institutional configurations

Policy Brief on Scaling the Impact of Social Enterprises

The welfare state and social entrepreneurship: Insights from a multi-level study of European regions

Women earn less than men even when they set the pay

To ask or not to ask? The power and pain of seeking feedback

A new apprenticeship for a new economic reality

Unltd Impact Report 2016

How corporates can engage with social entrepreneurs

How can social entrepeneurship break through?

Social enterprises in Germany and the refugee crisis: What role do they take?

By Miriam Wolf and Alexandra Ioan

More than a year ago - in the midst of what is often called the refugee crisis and in the midst of our survey data collection - we realized that organizations in the social sector were rethinking their activities as a reaction to the refugee crisis. We reflected about the role of German social enterprises might take in this situation in a country where the state has a particularly strong and pronounced role in social service provision. 

Meanwhile, looking at the survey results from the SEFORÏS project, German social enterprises emerged as particularly strong collaborators and innovators.  

This motivated us to take a step back and look more closely at what this means in the context of the refugee crisis. We followed up with almost a quarter (24) of the 107 German organizations who participated in our survey and asked them about the role they took in relation to this new challenge. 

While half of these organizations indicated that they had already worked with refugees before the refugee crisis, most of them have intensified or scaled their services as a consequence of the crisis. 9 out of 24 organizations indicated that they added refugees as beneficiaries to their target groups, 6 of them long-term, 3 temporarily. Only two organizations indicated they do not work with refugees and do not plan to do so in the future. 

Adapting established structures to changing needs

We found that 21 out of the 24 social enterprises that responded to our short survey have developed new services (15), processes (8) or products (7) as a response to needs they saw emerging with the refugee crisis. 

So what kind of services, products and processes did they predominantly develop? We find two principal types of social enterprises in this case: the ‘capacity builders’ and the ‘access facilitators’.

The ’capacity builders’ channel resources into other organizations or actors working with refugees: they support schools, youth organizations or business organizations in working with refugees. This type of social enterprises engages in adapting existing structures to changing needs – for instance by supporting teachers in dealing with students who do not speak German and have a different cultural background. 

The ’access facilitators’ focuses on the refugees themselves. Here we found predominantly organizations who support refugees to enter the labor market or gain access to education, thus enabling the target group to make use of existing structures and opportunities. 

This suggests that, apart from the organizations that design their own internal programs for refugees, social enterprises also take a mediating role in the refugee crisis: one the one hand they support established structures in adapting to changing needs, while on the other they enable beneficiaries to make use of existing opportunities.

Socia enterprises - refugees

Strength through collaboration and diversity

A year ago we also asked if the refugee crisis might be an opportunity for diverse actors in the German welfare state to move closer together and address challenges collectively. Today we find that on average, the 24 social enterprises we followed-up with reported to collaborate with more than 4 different types of partners in their refugee-related activities. What is striking is the diversity of collaborations:  14 collaborate with welfare organizations, 13 with other social enterprises, 12 with charities and 11 with business organizations. This corroborates our more general SEFORÏS survey findings about the connecting role of social enterprises linking sectors and stakeholders in tackling social challenges.

Although our data on the role of social enterprises in the refugee crisis is not representative of a large population, it does gives some further food for thought of how social enterprises contribute to solving emerging social challenges. Firstly, by mediating between existing structures and changing social needs, they contribute to the adaptation of the social sector to emerging challenges. Secondly, by collaborating with actors from different sectors simultaneously they contribute to pooling capacities and resources to tackle the social challenges we face as a society. 

First SEFORÏS Cross-Country Results available!

Market-Oriented and Mission-Focused: Social Enterprises Around the Globe

Between April 2015 and December 2015, the SEFORÏS consortium surveyed over 1000 social enterprises in Hungary, Romania, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Russia and China. This means that thanks to the diligent cooperation of social enterprises and funding from the European Union, we have been able to launch the world’s largest and most rigorous panel database on social enterprises. This report presents key findings for all the countries investigated. Where possible, we compare findings to the 2009 SELUSI survey, the predecessor of the SEFORIS project. 

A detailed blog post, written by SEFORÏS researchers Marieke Huysentruyt, Johanna Mair and Ute Stephan is available on Stanford Social Innovation Review's website.